OvermountainIt was a crowded noisy dance floor but I heard the phone ring and it was my good friend Heather who couldn’t wait to tell me that Senator Kevin Ranker had just announced that the State of Washington put aside a cool ten million bucks to protect Blanchard Mountain from further destruction.

Whoopee! I couldn’t help myself. This is such good news for us tree huggers.

And the timing could not have been better. The following evening was the Skagit Land Trust Annual Membership meeting and, honest admission, it’s so nice to be in a room full of fellow travelers at a time when our country is so divided.

We met at the Fidalgo Bay Resort owned by the Samish Indian Nation in Anacortes and the meeting started with a haunting melody sung by a young Samish woman in her native language. This made me happy to hear that a new generation is preserving an ancient culture. Another example of preserving something that is precious to so many!

For me, the highlight of the meeting was the special commendation to Rusty Kuntze and Libby Mills for donating 23 acres of their land in Bayview to the Land Trust as a conservation easement. Rusty is the retired Judge for the Swinomish Tribe. Libby is an educator and naturalist whose passion is introducing people to special places and the flora and fauna found there. She has taught me and many others more about birds then I thought was possible.

Rusty and LibbyRusty calls Wren Ridge his Walden Pond and has come for the first time to understand what a special relationship Henry David Thoreau had with a place that wasn’t necessarily considered a primo spot. It wasn’t the Grand Canyon or the Redwood Forest but became a place he went to for redemption and realization.

Rusty points out that Jesus, Moses, Buddha and Mohammed each had a special place in the wilderness where they were able to find enlightenment. As a little kid, Rusty always wanted a treehouse but it never happened in his New Jersey suburban home. Now he has a whole forest that is his treehouse.

They stated that because they don’t have children, their legacy will be the opportunity to ensure the diverse wetlands and forests of Wren Ridge will protected for future generations. Forever!

The prestigious Blue Heron Award went to Molly Doran, who is the executive director of the Land Trust. The award usually only goes to a staff member who is retired so Molly was wonderfully stunned to realize she was this year’s recipient. Through clever subterfuge, the staff led her to believe that award was being to a former board member.

Blanchard Overlook, Molly DoranThe Blue Heron Award is given to someone who has shown extraordinary dedication to the lands of Skagit County. During Molly’s watch, there has been big growth of supporters and community participation in protecting special places. She made it clear that she loves her job and has no plans of retiring.

Near and dear to me are the wetlands that are being preserved on the Southern end of Big Lake. I’m hoping we can add a learning center so visitors can see for themselves what makes wetlands so fascinating and worthy of preservation. The best scenario is to preserve a spot and still allow it to be accessible to a new generation of caretakers.

This is what’s happened with Blanchard Mountain. With this generous grant from the State, the beautiful trails through 1400 acres of forest land will be protected. Birdwatchers, hang gliders, hikers will forever be able to enjoy a peaceful place with fantastic views.

I was driving down from my day job in Canada a few days ago and I decided to take the mellow route. It was a perfect winter day, with peekaboo blue skies and beautiful cloud formations. I craved something sweet and decided to detour to my friend’s delightful bakery in Edison. When I made a turn on Colony Road, there was Blanchard Mountain, tall, majestic, wearing a cumulus top hat.

Tears of joy started running down my cheeks, so much so that I had to laugh. Talk about SWEET!!!